Dignity for Disabled (2004 – 2009)
In 2004, a group of parents were frustrated with the lack of appropriate post-school options for their children with disabilities and established Dignity for Disabled (d4d). The key focus was to lobby the government to increase funding for the disability sector. d4d were politically motivated, seeking media opportunities to raise awareness of the issues facing people with disabilities in the general community.

Portrait of Dr Paul Collier PhD
(Portrait of Dr Paul Collier PhD)

Dignity for Disability (2009 – 2016)
In 2009 Rick Neagle and Dr Paul Collier reignited d4d, moving the focus of the organisation towards human rights issues, and expanding the scope of d4d to include mental health. With an increased membership base, seven d4d party members stood for election at the 2010 South Australian election, under the name Dignity for Disability. Dr Collier died shortly before the 2010 SA election, but with his name on the ballot paper, the party drew enough support to elect the second candidate on the ticket, Kelly Vincent.

Dignity Party (2016 – )
With an elected member of parliament, the work of Dignity for Disability grew to a breadth beyond the disability portfolio alone, so the name was shortened to highlight this. In 2010, Hon Kelly Vincent MLC was elected for an 8 year term, which will expire on Saturday 17th March, 2018. The name Dignity Party was made official in the Government Gazette on 8th December, 2016. The colour purple, along with the conviction that a better way is necessary and possible, are abiding themes in all that this group of passionate, committed citizens set out to achieve. People in other states of Australia and around the world have enquired about the possibility of creating similar organisations to reflect this grass-roots uprising of people with disabilities and their family carers and supporters. Dignity Party remains a South Australian body, dedicated to electing representatives to the parliament to further the work of creating awareness and enshrining greater equity into law.